Relocation

Top Tips when contemplating working overseas….

By 28 November 2021January 14th, 2022No Comments

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Top Tips To Consider When Contemplating Working Overseas…

Written by: Doctor V, Executive Contributor

Executive Contributors at Brainz Magazine are handpicked and invited to contribute because of their knowledge and valuable insight within their area of expertise.

In the off days at work, we sometime dream about working somewhere else, and this can include wondering what it would be like to move abroad. The idea can seem quite intoxicating, especially when you speak to people who have had good experiences of doing exactly that. Add in some apathy at work, or with the weather / the area in which you live, and you’re about ready to pack those bags!

Working abroad can be one of the best experiences of your life, or a living nightmare – both of which hinge on your preparation before committing yourself. So I want to outline some groundwork here that you can do which will help you decide if it’s for you, or not.

Work that is available abroad:

  • You can always move abroad first, then find work – this is the easiest in terms of the job process itself, but you run the risk of delays until you get the job you want.

  • Relocating overseas for a new job is much easier if you work for a global company who have similar roles in other countries. Their HR department is frequently set up to assisting you with visas, leasing arrangements, local contract requirements and may even cover your relocation expenses, especially useful if you don’t speak the local language.

Simply check out where their offices are worldwide, make some informal enquiries and check out their HR policy on relocation. Watch out for pay, tax and annual leave differences…

  • Global agencies and program providers will also be advertising, but they will charge a fee e.g. TEFL helps people teach abroad. But the list is long, if you look.

  • A work exchange may be possible, where you find someone of a standing professional standing abroad, this usually means your housing (+/- food) is included in the program. Great for the budget, but the housing may not always be in your control.

  • Volunteering or taking a sabbatical is something that people decide to do, in order to give back in some way. This is a very common route o working abroad.

  • Freelance contracting is increasingly popular, especially in the post-COVID era of working remotely. Just watch the time differences, I have personal experience of giving presentations at 4am local time when working for a company across the world!

What should you be investigating, before your final decision:

  • I can’t stress enough how important cultural differences are to you enjoying your new life in the job abroad – both on a professional and personal level. The way people relate to one another, and their expectations of you in day to day interactions depend on where you want to go. I’ve learnt this from working with global clients for many years, as well as travelling – but it’s not until you LIVE somewhere that you see beyond the tourist experience you may have had, or the difference from the movie portrayals!

  • Working visas differ from country to country, so it’s important that you do some of your own research to look at the differences here – mostly in the stipulations around timing allowances. Visa applications can be arduous and the process can take months.

  • Obviously, you’ll be thinking of setting up a back account, or leasing a car etc, but you’ll need good credit rating in order to do these things. Well before you move, make sure you’ve considered getting an international credit card to building up your rating which may be recognised abroad.

  • People don’t always consider the personal side of moving for new job. This can make all the difference to whether you stay or go, so think about it: what are expats saying, what do the local TV culture shows talk about, do you know any acquaintances in the area you can meet via Zoom and what’s your strategy with learning the local lingo?

Other things to consider:

  • How will Fido get across with you? I advocate you seeking advice from pet travel services well in advance, as these guys have transporting our furry loved ones down to a fine art.

  • Do you keep all your stuff in storage and rent furnished accommodation initially? Do you stay in air B & B until you physically find a suitable long term rental? This is where daydreaming about which towns or places you want to head for is a great thing; you can start looking at random rental options to give you ideas on pricing and quality of accommodation. Also, what transport options are there to your company based offices?

The beauty about the contemplation stage, is that you can spend as long as you like in your spare time researching all of the above. Just by tentatively looking into things, various deal-breakers / makers will appear to help re-direct your search and formulate your final decision.

Working abroad is one of the most rewarding experiences a person can have, and you’ll create life-long memories, meet incredible people, travel, and also learn about how you can live a more enriched life in general, wherever you finally end up. Do the homework, and you won’t regret it – nothing to lose by looking into things, right? Alternatively, you can always get me involved to help you out from a more holistic and strategic approach!

Whatever you decide, don’t give up on your dream.

 

You can book a Free 15-minute chat with Doctor V to discuss your situation.

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